Why Fade did not “Fade” The Hyper-Sexualized Black Female Image

Great analysis on “Fade” and the not so subliminal showcasing of damaging stereotypes of the BW.

Whispers of a Womanist

Teyana Taylor resurfaced as a cultural phenomenon in Kanye West’s latest creation “Fade.” Although the creator of 2009’s “Google Me,” many have not googled Taylor in years. Not exactly a forgotten presence, Taylor launched her own company, and graced the music world with the occasional feature, maintaining a private yet modestly popular Hollywood status. teyana-taylor-kanye-west-fade-video-01

Flash forward to late 2016 and over twelve million viewers gazed as an immensely oiled Taylor provocatively danced in a manner more sexual than enigmatic. It is this overt yet inundated sexuality that foster’s Taylor resurrection from obscurity to a contemporary sex symbol. This attention appears complimentary for Taylor and for black femininity. However, sexuality is anything but a new tool for black female representation and reinvention. Kerry Washington, Gabrielle Union and Viola Davis transitioned from supporting roles to leading ladies in exuding hyper-sexualized heroines on prime-time series.

saartje_baartman_portraitThis hyper-sexuality guises itself as a celebration for…

View original post 634 more words

Advertisements